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Сабақ жоспары "Days of week " (3 сынып)

Курсы профессиональной переподготовки от Московского учебного центра "Профессионал"

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Unit 3 EO 1 Grade 5

Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 1


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Family and friends

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.1.5.1-use feedback to set personal learning objectives;

5.1.6.1- organize and present information clearly to others

5.2.6.1 - deduce meaning from context in short, supported talk on an increasing range of general and curricular topics

5.3.7.1- use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax to talk about a limited range of general topics

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

learn vocabulary for friends and family.

talk about my own family.

draw and describe my family tree.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Consider classmates' feedback and set personal learning objectives based on their feedback

  • Organize information logically. Express ideas clearly

  • Figure out the content of a short conversation with some support

  • Apply topic related vocabulary in speech appropriately arranging words and phrases into well-formed sentences

Value links

Respect, cooperation and transparency

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Unit presentation

Books closed. Ask: Who are the important people in your life? Elicit students’ answers to this question, e.g. my mum, mybrother, my best friend.

Ask students to open their books, look at the picture and say what they can see in it.

Put students into small groups. Give them a minute to answer the three questions. Point out that only the first of the three questions has an obvious answer.

Check answers. You could introduce the word probably, which students can then use when giving their answers to the second and third questions. If you do, explain that the word is used to say that something is very likely, e.g. I’m probably going to the cinema this afternoon.

Tell students that the theme of Unit 3 is family and friends.

Suggested answers

There are probably four people in this family. The adults are probably between thirty and forty. The children are probably between two and fifteen. You wear boots like that when it rains.

Warm up

Distribute photos of your own friends and family around the classroom and ask students to work in pairs to guess the identities of the people in them, e.g. I think this is your mum.

Alternatively, introduce the topic by asking students if they have a collection of photos of their friends and family online and which photo websites (e.g. Instagram, Flickr) they use.

If students have such accounts, they can use their phones to

briefly show each other some of the photos they have there.

Preparation

Bring a few photos of your family and friends.

Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 27 and look at Sarah Wood’s family tree. Make sure they identify Sarah (with caption ‘Me!’ middle left).




LISTENING

2. 1.23 Ask students to work in small groups to complete this exercise. You could turn this task into a game by asking groups to compete to be the first to complete the text correctly.

Ask stronger students to complete the text without checking the meaning of the words in a dictionary. Allow weaker students to use dictionaries.

Play the recording.

Students listen to it, check their answers to Exercise 1 and repeat the words. Encourage students to mimic the pronunciation they hear.

Fast finishers:

Students can turn to the Vocabulary bank on page 118 and do the Family and friends activities.

Answers

2 granddad 3 wife 4 grandma 5 mum 6 dad 7 parents 8 brother 9 sister 10 aunt 11 uncle 12 cousin 13 best friend 14 teammates

15 classmates

Language note

All the two syllable nouns in the box in Exercise 2 have their main stress on the first syllable, e.g. teammates, uncle, cousin. The word mate means friend or partner. It is commonly used in the UK and Australia as a greeting between (usually male) friends, e.g. All right, mate!


3 • Read out the example and then ask students to work in pairs to match the remaining words in pairs of opposites.

Then ask them to look at the example sentence and complete the remaining ones.

Answers

2 son 3 daughter 4 grandson


4 • Before students do this exercise make sure they understand

the difference between male and female.

Ask students to copy the circles into their notebooks.

Students can work alone or in pairs to complete the circles with the words in Exercise 2.

Ask students to compare their answers with a partner before you check answers with the class.

Answers

female: wife, sister, grandma, mum

male and female: cousin, classmates, best friend, parents,

grandparents

male: brother, dad, granddad, husband

Your turn


5 • Divide students into pairs (A and B).

Give students two minutes to draw their own family tree. Explain that they can use the example in Exercise 1 as a guide.

Read out the example sentences and ask Student As to tell their partner about the people in their family tree. They should add any other information they can, e.g. age or hair colour.

Student Bs listen and make notes.

The pairs then swap and Student Bs describe their family tree and Student As listen and makes notes.


Optional activity


Put students into small groups.

One student (Student A) shows a photo of a family member or friend on their phone to their partners. • The other students in the group guess who is in the photo by asking a question, e.g. Is that your brother?

Student A replies by saying Yes, it is or No, it isn’t.

The other students then ask Student A some questions to find out more about the person in the photo, e.g. What’s his/her name? How old is he/she?

Another student in the group then shows a photo to the rest and the activity continues until all students have had a turn.

Homework


Set Exercises 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 on page 17 of the Workbook for homework.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?



Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 2


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: A big Family

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.5.3.1- write with support factual descriptions at text level which describe people, places and objects;

5.4.2.1- understand with little support specific information and detail in short, simple texts on a limited range of general and curricular topics;

5.3.5.1- keep interaction going in basic exchanges on a growing range of general and curricular topics;

5.3.7.1- use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax to talk about a limited range of general topics

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

read an article about a big family.

learn adjective opposites.

compare my own family with the one in the article.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • write factual descriptions at text level

  • Identify details in a text with little support

  • Support a talk on a given general topic

  • Apply topic related vocabulary in speech appropriately arranging words and phrases into well-formed sentences

Value links

Respect, cooperation and transparency

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

Books closed. Find out who in the class has got the biggest family by asking individual students: How many brothers and sisters have you got?

Alternatively, tell the class how many brothers and sisters you have got.


Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 28.

Focus their attention on the photos. Encourage students to make predictions about what the text is about using the images and title to help them.

Read out the title and the question.

Elicit answers from the class.

Answer

It’s a very big family.


2 • Check students’ understanding of the following vocabulary from the article: noisy, busy and kids. Teach noisy by opening and closing drawers loudly in your desk, dropping things on the floor, singing and generally making a noise. Teach busy by doing lots of different things one after another, e.g. read, write, take things out of your bag, and keep checking the time on your watch or phone. Tell students that kids is an informal word for children.

Ask students to read the article.

Students can compare their answers in pairs before you check answers with the class. Ask students to say which part of the text gave them the answer (the last sentence).

Refer students to the information in the FACT! box. Ask: Do you know where the word ‘family’ comes from? Tell students that it comes from the Latin famulus, which means slave or servant.

Answers

Yes, it’s a very happy family. All the kids are good friends.


3 • Read out the instructions and the example.

Ask different students to come to the board in turn to correct the false sentences

Answers

2 F (There are fifteen boys and girls in the family.) 3 T 4 F (It’s a very noisy house.) 5 F (The kids are all good friends.)


4. Explore adjectives

Refer students to the adjectives in the list. Ask them to work alone to find the opposite adjectives in the article.

Students can compare their answers in pairs before you check answers with the whole class.

To extend this activity, ask students to work with a partner. Students take it in turns to draw or mime the adjectives for their partner to guess.

Answers

2 big 3 noisy 4 happy 5 good

Game


Play Could you spell that, please? using the words in Exercise 4.

See Games Bank on page 28.

Your turn


5 • Give students a couple of minutes to make notes on the differences between their family and Damien’s family.

Monitor, making sure that students are completing the chart by using the adjectives in Exercise 4.

6 • Ask students to work in pairs to do this exercise.

Students should produce sentences such as: Damien’s family is big, but my family is very small.

Ask a few students to read their sentences out to the class.


Optional activity


Put students into pairs.

Students take it in turns to use their phones to record a video of each other talking about their families.

Students can then play their videos for the class.

Homework


Set Exercises 6 and 7 on page 18 and Exercises 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 on page 21 of the Workbook for homework.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 3


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Language focus 1 have got

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.1.6.1- organize and present information clearly to others;

5.3.3.1- give an opinion at sentence level on a limited range of general and curricular topics;

5.3.4.1- respond with limited flexibility at sentence level to unexpected comments on an increasing range of general and curricular topics;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

learn the affirmative, negative, question and short answer forms of have got.

practise asking and answering questions about possessions with have got.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Organize information logically. Express ideas clearly

  • Provide a point of view in connected sentences

  • Provide unprepared speech to answer a variety of questions at sentence level with limited flexibility

Value links

Lifelong learning

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

Books closed. Hold up objects and say: I’ve got a book. I’ve got a

pencil., etc.

Ask students to work in pairs. Students take it in turns to hold up and name objects around them using have got.


Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 29 and copy the chart into their notebooks. Students can then work in pairs to complete the sentences by referring to the text on page 28.

Give weaker students the two forms they need to complete the sentences and ask them to put the forms into the right gaps in the chart.

Check answers.

For further information and additional exercises, ask students to turn to page 110 of the Grammar reference section.

Language note

Have got is used far more frequently in spoken British English than American English. Have got denotes possession (e.g. I’ve got a piano) whereas have can be used for both possession and routines (e.g. I have a shower every morning).


2 • Ask: What can you see in the picture? Elicit students’ answers.

Refer students to the gapped text. Encourage them to read the text first for general understanding.

Students should identify the personal subject pronouns or the singular or plural nouns that come before the gaps in the text. Doing this will lead them to the correct form of have got that they need to complete the text.

Students should refer to the chart in Exercise 1 to remind them of the correct forms of have got.

Fast finishers

Students can write four pairs of sentences about their own family using the full and contracted forms of have got, e.g. I have got a sister. I’ve got a sister.

Answers

1 ’ve got 2 haven’t got 3 ’ve got 4 ’s got

5 ’s got 6 haven’t got 7 haven’t got


3 • Ask students to look at the pictures and name the objects they can see, e.g. trainers, headphones, scarf. • Read out the example and complete number 2 with the class.

Ask students to work in pairs to complete the exercise.

Check answers with the class.

Answers

2 Has Alice got a computer? Yes, she has.

3 Has James got black trainers? No, he hasn’t.

4 Has Alice got a skateboard? No, she hasn’t.

5 Has James got blue headphones? Yes, he has.

6 Has Alice got a CD? Yes, she has.

7 Has James got a hat? No, he hasn’t.

Common error!!!

Students may say Yes, I have got or No, I haven’t got rather than Yes, I have or No, I haven’t.

Your turn


5 • Put students into pairs.

Give them a couple of minutes to ask and answer questions about what they have got using the information in the chart and two ideas of their own.

Ask weaker students to write their questions down before they ask them.


Optional activity


Divide students into pairs.

Students first tell each other about how many people there are in their family, e.g. I’ve got three sisters, one brother, a mum and dad.

Students think of questions with have got to ask their partner about members of their family, e.g. Has your brother got a computer?

Students ask and answer the questions.

To finish the activity, ask some students to tell the class about their partner’s family, e.g. Bogdan’s got one sister. His sister’s got a cat.


VIDEO You can show this video as either a lead-in or a follow-up to the Language Focus 1 lesson. 3.1 Robot Fighters

Ask: What is a robot? Elicit student’s answers and then read out the information about the video.

Play the video.

Students watch it and answer the two questions.

Check answers. Then ask students: Are robots a good idea?

See page 135 for further activities you can do with this video


Answers

The Suni family has got a lot of robots.

Arina’s robot is blue.

Homework


Set Exercises 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 on page 18 of the Workbook for homework. You can also ask students to take a photo of some of their favourite things, bring it to the next lesson and show it to their partner. Students then have to say what things their partner has got.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 4


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Describing people

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.2.2.1 - understand an increasing range of unsupported basic questions which ask for personal information;

5.2.6.1 - deduce meaning from context in short, supported talk on an increasing range of general and curricular topics;

5.3.7.1- use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax to talk about a limited range of general topics

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

listen to a conversation about a virtual world.

learn words to describe people.

write a description of my avatar.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Recognize basic personal questions without support

  • Figure out the content of a short conversation with some support

  • Apply topic related vocabulary in speech appropriately arranging words and phrases into well-formed sentences

Value links

Respect, openness

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?

Preparation

Bring photocopies of the audioscript (Exercise 2).

A conversation

Background

An avatar is a graphical image that represents a person online. Virtual worlds are three-dimensional environments simulated by computers.

Warm up

Books closed. Write avatars and virtual worlds on the board. Check that students understand these terms.

Put students in pairs to tell one another about which video games they know and enjoy playing.


Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 30.

Read out the question and then ask students to work in

pairs to answer it.

Suggested answers

They’ve got skateboards, rollerskates, headphones and a dog.


LISTENING

2. 1.24 Before students listen, ask them to make a list of the words they might hear in the recording.

Play the recording.

Students can compare answers in pairs before you check answers with the class.

Answers

Connor’s avatar has got a blue skateboard and spiky

blue hair.


3. 1.24 Play the recording again.

Give weaker students the audioscript to read as they listen

to the recording.

Students work in pairs to correct the sentences.

Check answers.

Answers

1 F (the game is called ‘My 3D home’)

2 F (Connor is on Level 16.) 3 F (Connor’s got seven stars.)

4 F (Suzi’s avatar has got a red skateboard.)


Describing people

4. 1.25 Write Connor’s avatar has got spiky hair on the board. Ask students to identify which word in the sentence is an adjective (spiky).

Read out the words in the box and under the pictures.

Students copy the word groups into their notebooks and then add the words to the correct groups.

Play the recording for students to check their answers and repeat the words.

Fast finishers

Students can turn to the Vocabulary bank on page 118 and do the Describing people activities.

Answers

1 straight 2 brown 3 blue 4 short 5 good-looking

6 old 7 funny 8 intelligent

Language note

Fun is a noun meaning ‘something that provides amusement or entertainment’, e.g. We had fun at the party. Funny is an

adjective meaning ‘causing laughter or amusement’, e.g. It’s a very funny fi lm. In informal English, fun is also used as an adjective meaning ‘enjoyable’ or ‘amusing’, e.g. We had a fun time. Pretty is used to describe women and girls who are attractive in appearance, whereas good-looking can be used to describe both sexes.

Your turn


5 • Give students five minutes to write their descriptions.

Students read their description to a partner, who draws a picture of the avatar being described.


Homework


Set Exercises 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 on page 19 of the Workbook for homework.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 5


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Language focus 2 Comparative adjectives

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.6.1.1- use appropriate countable and uncountable nouns, including common noun phrases describing times and location, on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

5.6.2.1- use quantifiers many , much , a lot of ,a few on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

5.6.3.1- use a growing variety of adjectives and regular and irregular comparative and superlative adjectives on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

learn comparative adjectives.

describe a picture using comparative adjectives.

compare myself to another student using comparative adjectives.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Describe time and location on familiar topics using countable and uncountable nouns

  • Apply the correct quantifiers in the context

  • Apply the rule for comparative and superlative adjectives

Value links

Respect, openness

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?

Preparation

Bring a tennis ball or a small football.

Warm up

Books closed. Introduce comparatives by drawing a picture of two people on the board.

Give the two people names and make them look as different from one another as you can. One can be tall and unhappy and the other short and happy.

Write one sentence on the board comparing the two people and then elicit further sentences from the class, helping students to form comparative adjectives.

Follow the same procedure as above but this time draw three people. One can be tall, the other taller and the third the tallest of all.

Write a sentence on the board showing that this person is the most of a group (the tallest).


Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 31 and copy the chart into their notebooks.

Students can then work in pairs to complete the chart.

For further information and additional exercises, ask students to turn to page 110 of the Grammar reference section.


Common error

Students may produce sentences like more better than or beautifuler than. They may also use that instead of than.

Get it right!

Students could practise this spelling rule by writing some example sentences using adjectives whose final consonant is doubled in the comparative and superlative form, e.g. fat, thin, hot.



2 • Write the chart on the board and ask individual students to come to the front of the class to complete it.

Students then pass their answers to another team for marking.

Teams get one point for a correct adjective but only if it is spelt correctly. The team with the most points wins. If there is no winner, write an incorrect sentence on the board, e.g. Shymkent is bigger than Aktobe. The first team to correct the sentence wins the game.

Answers

1 shorter 2 the curliest 3 darker 4 the best

5 more beautiful 6 the youngest 7 older

8 the most intelligent 9 prettier


3 • Ask stronger students to complete the sentences individually.

Allow weaker students to work in pairs to complete the sentences.

Check answers by writing the gapped sentences on the board and asking different students to come to the front of the class to complete them.

Fast finishers

Students can write five sentences comparing famous people or places.

Answers

1 curlier than 2 older than 3 more intelligent than

4 funnier than 5 taller than 6 straighter than


1.26 Play the recording for students to listen to and repeat the sentences.

Make sure that students are pronouncing the ‘th’ of than correctly (the correct pronunciation is /ð/).



4 • Read out an adjective from the box and then choose a student to make a sentence about the dogs using that adjective.

Ask students to work in pairs to write the sentences.

Suggested answers

2 Libby is smaller than Patch. 3 Patch’s hair is straighter than Libby’s hair. 4 Libby is prettier than Patch.

5 Patch’s ears are longer than Libby’s ears. 6 Patch is noisier than Libby. 7 Libby is quieter than Patch.


5 • Give students one minute to read through the text.

Ask stronger students to complete the gaps individually.

Ask weaker students to work in pairs to complete the gaps.

Check answers by asking seven students in turn to write an answer on the board.

Answers

1 tallest 2 oldest 3 most intelligent 4 youngest

5 shortest 6 noisiest 7 funniest

Your turn


6 • Put students in pairs to compare people in their family using the adjectives in the box. Make sure students write their sentences in their notebooks.

7 • Put students into pairs.

Give them a few minutes to tell each other about their family.

Ask students to tell the class about their partner's family.


Game


Play The ball game using comparatives and superlatives.

See Games Bank on page 28.


Homework


Set Exercises 1, 2 and 3 on page 20 of the Workbook for homework


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 6


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: My family, by Boris Moldanov

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.2.6.1 - deduce meaning from context in short, supported talk on an increasing range of general and curricular topics;

5.2.8.1 - understand supported narratives, including some extended talk, on an increasing range of general and curricular topics

5.3.6.1- communicate meaning clearly at sentence level during, pair, group and whole class exchanges;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

watch a video about a family in Siberia.

compare my own town with the town in the video.

compare my own family with the family in the video.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Figure out the content of a short conversation with some support

  • Recognize the meaning of a story and extended talk with some support

  • Interact with each other delivering content correctly and clearly to others

Value links

Respect, openness

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?

Preparation

Make photocopies of the videoscript.


Warm up

Write Siberia on the board and ask students what they know about the region.

Alternatively, you could write the words in Exercise 1 on the board and see if students can predict which part of the world the video is about.

Background

Siberia is an enormous region located in Russia and the north of

Kazakhstan, known for its extremely cold winters and large forests.

Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 32.

Refer students to the map so that they can identify the location of Siberia.

Check that students understand the meaning of the words in the box.

Students can work alone or in pairs to find six of the things in the photos.

Answers

Siberia is in Russia.

fi re forest Khanti people dancing snow reindeer

Language note

Students may find sleigh difficult to pronounce. Point out that sleigh /sleɪ/ rhymes with say.


2 • Ask the question of the class. Be aware of which students do not often contribute when you ask the class questions which do not have obvious answers, and make sure that the most confident students do not dominate.

You could ask students to justify the answers they give to the question, e.g. I think we’ll see snow because Siberia is very cold.




3. 3.2 Play the video with the sound off.

Students watch the video and check their answers to Exercise 1.

Answers

dancing fire Khanti people reindeer sleigh

snowmobile


4. 3.2 Read out the three summaries and check that students understand them.

Then play the video for students to choose the best summary.

Students can compare answers in pairs before you compare answers with the class.

Answers

b


5. 3.2 Ask a student to read out the three sentences.

Then play the next part of the video so that students can order the events.

Ask one student to give the answers to the exercise. Ask the rest of the class whether or not they agree.

Answers

b – c – a


6. 3.2 Give students a minute to read through sentences 1–7.

Play the video again and ask students to decide if sentences 1–7 are true or false.

Give weaker students a copy of the script, which they can then read as they watch the video.

Answers

1 T 2 F (They’ve got about 50 reindeer.) 3 F (The town has got one shop and one road.) 4 F (Boris’ father and brother go to visit his grandparents.) 5 T 6 T 7 T

Your turn


7 • Give students a couple of minutes to complete the chart with their own information. Monitor and help as necessary.

8 • Put students into pairs.

Students take it in turns to tell each other about how where they live compares with where Boris lives.


Homework


For homework, ask students to use the Internet to research an aspect of life in Siberia, e.g. food, weather or culture. At the beginning of the next class, students share what they found out with a partner.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 7


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: A Family Festival

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.4.2.1- understand with little support specific information and detail in short, simple texts on a limited range of general and curricular topics;

5.4.3.1- understand the detail of an argument on a limited range of familiar general and curricular topics;

5.5.5.1- link without support sentences using basic coordinating connectors;

5.5.7.1- use with some support appropriate layout at text level for a limited range of written genres on familiar general topics and some curricular topics;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

read a text about Diwali.

talk about festivals in my own country.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Identify details in a text with little support

  • Recognize factual details in a given argument related to the topic

  • Link sentences using basic coordinating connectors

  • Identify the correct form of a word, appropriate sentence structure and text layout

Value links

Respect, openness

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?

Preparation

Bring some photos of famous festivals from around the world, e.g. Hogmany in Scotland, the Rio Carnival in Brazil or La Tomatina in Spain.

Warm up

Books closed. Distribute the photos around the class.

Ask: What can you see? Encourage students to describe the photos in as much detail as they are able to provide.

Explain that the photos show festivals and that people around the world celebrate festivals and that these celebrations are important in people’s lives. Check students’ understanding of these key words.

Background

The festival of Diwali marks the beginning of winter. It is a time to clean and decorate the home and to exchange gifts with loved ones.

Mumbai is a port city in West India. It is the largest city in India and has a population of more than 20 million.

Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 33. Focus attention on the photo.

Elicit ideas about what is happening in the photo and where the people are. Do not accept or reject any ideas at this stage.

2 • Ask students to read the text to check their ideas about the photo that they came up with in Exercise 1.

Answers

Raj is from India.

Diwali is an important family festival in Indian culture.


3 • Read out the title to the interview and the short introduction.

Ask students to work alone to read about Diwali and then match the questions to the paragraphs.

Students can compare answers in pairs.

Answers

1 d What is Diwali? 2 b When is it? 3 a Where is it?

4 c What’s important in Diwali?


4 • Students can work in pairs to do the task.

Ask students to underline the parts of the text which helped them complete the exercise.

Read out the information in the FACT! box. Ask: How many festivals are there in your country?

Ask students to name some festivals, say what they celebrate and where they take place.

Answers

1 good 2 lights 3 five days 4 People all over the

world 5 clothes

Optional activity


Put students into small groups. Give each group a festival to research, e.g. the Lantern Festival in Pingxi, Taiwan; Queen’s Day in the Netherlands; the Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, China.

Assign different roles to students in their groups (or ask the students to decide roles for themselves), e.g. one does the writing, one looks for information online, one communicates the results of the search to the class.

Students do an Internet search about the festival.

Students should provide the name of the festival, say where it takes place, what it celebrates, how long it lasts and what people do during the festival.

Each group tells the class about what it has found out.


5. Explore adjective suffixes -ful

Ask students to work alone to find two adjectives in the interview which have the -ful suffix.

Check answers. Make sure that students understand that the -ful suffix means full of, e.g. colourful = full of colour.

Answers

1 colourful 2 wonderful


6 • Ask students to work alone to complete the sentences.

Students can compare answers in pairs before you check answers with the class.

Answers

1 wonderful 2 colourful


7 • Read out the two words and ask the class to turn them into adjectives using the suffix -ful.

To extend work on the vocabulary, ask students to turn to the Vocabulary bank on page 118.

Answers

beautiful, useful

Your turn


8 • Give students time to think of a festival in their country that they have been to or are interested in going to.

Make sure students do not all choose the same festival.

Give students a few minutes to make notes on the festival they choose. If necessary, they can look up information about the festival on the Internet.

Help weaker students by giving them specific questions to find answers to, e.g. What’s the festival called? Where is it? When is it?

9 • Put students in pairs to do the task.

Ask some students to report back to the class on the festival their partner talked about.


Homework


Set Exercise 4 on page 20 of the Workbook for homework.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 8


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Speaking on the phone

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.3.5.1- keep interaction going in basic exchanges on a growing range of general and curricular topics;

5.3.6.1- communicate meaning clearly at sentence level during, pair, group and whole class exchanges;

5.2.2.1 - understand an increasing range of unsupported basic questions which ask for personal information

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

watch or listen to teenagers taking about mobile numbers and e-mail addresses.

practise giving out mobile numbers and email addresses.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Recognize basic personal questions without support

  • Support a talk on a given general topic

  • Interact with each other delivering content correctly and clearly to others

Value links

Respect, openness

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

Books closed. Write an email address and a phone number on the board and ask the class to identify what they are.

Practise how to read phone numbers and email addresses by saying the ones you have written on the board and asking the students to repeat them after you.


Practice

REAL TALK: What’s your phone number? What’s your email address?

1. 3.3 Ask students to open their books at page 34.

Tell students they are going to watch some teenagers answering the following questions:

What’s your phone number? What’s your email address?

Give students some time to look at the chart and then play the video.

Do not be afraid to play it a few times. You may also want to pause it after each speaker.

Students work alone to complete the chart with the correct email addresses and phone numbers.

Students can compare answers in pairs before you check answers with the class.

Answers

Phone number Email address

1 Petra 845 353 7500 petraiscool@yourmail.com

2 Stephen 866 279 9400 stephen@schoolemail.com

3 Rachel 212 337 5000 racheljane@online.com

4 Freddie 662 615 0410 bertie13@online.com

Language note

In phone numbers, 0 is read as the letter o /əʊ/in British English, whereas it is commonly read as zero in American English. Repeated numbers such as 77 are usually read double seven. In email addresses we read @ as at and . as dot, which means that john@gmail.com would be read john at g mail dot com.


2. Put students into pairs to practise asking and answering the two questions. Point out that if students do not want to give their actual email address or phone number out, they can simply make them up.

Ask some students to report back to the class on their partner’s phone number and email address.



3. 1.27 Play the recording. Ask students what Raj wants to do.

Answer

He wants to invite Pablo to his Diwali party.


4 • Ask: How can we make it easy for someone to understand what we say on the phone? Elicit some ideas, e.g. speak slowly and carefully, spell difficult names, repeat information, etc.

Ask stronger students to cover the phrases in the Useful language box. They can then attempt to complete the conversation with appropriate words and phrases.



5. 1.27 Play the recording again for students to listen and

check their answers to Exercise 4.

Answers

1 Hello? 2 Hi, it’s Raj. 3 Just a minute.

4 Can I call you back?

Language note

Students may use I’m when identifying themselves on the phone. Point out that we use it’s, e.g. It’s Olga rather than

I’m Olga.


6. Students work in pairs to practise the conversation in Exercise 4.

7. Read through the instructions and make sure that students understand what they have to do.

To help weaker students, read out and drill the phone numbers and email addresses before students do the activity.

Put students in pairs to practise their conversations.

Monitor while students are practising their conversations. Check that they are using the phrases from the Useful language box and saying the email addresses and phone numbers correctly.


Homework


For homework, ask students to record a short telephone conversation with a friend. The conversation can be based on the one in Exercise 4. At the beginning of the next lesson, students can play their recording to a partner.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 9


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: My best friend

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.5.1.1- plan, write, edit and proofread work at text level with support on a limited range of general and curricular topics;

5.5.3.1- write with support factual descriptions at text level which describe people, places and objects;

5.5.5.1- link without support sentences using basic coordinating connectors;

5.5.8.1- spell most high-frequency words accurately for a limited range of general topics

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

read a description of someone’s brother.

learn about the modifiers not very, quite and really/very.

write a description of my best friend.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Plan, write, edit and proofread work at text level

  • Write factual descriptions at text level

  • Spell most high-frequency words accurately

Value links

Respect, openness


Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

Books closed. Write best friend on the board. Ask: Who is your

best friend? Invite some students to tell the class something

about their best friend, e.g. My best friend is called Mehmet.

He’s 12. He lives in Istanbul.

You could also briefly describe your own best friend. Make sure

your description is similar in style and content to the one seen in

Exercise 1.



Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 35.

Students read the text quickly and answer the question.

Answer

Javier Ramos


2 • Tell students that the chart refers to Javier from Exercise 1.

Ask students to work alone to copy and complete the missing information.

Answers

Javier’s best friend

Name David

Age twenty

Home with Mum and Dad

Description tall, dark hair, green eyes,

intelligent and funny


3 • Read through the modifiers in the Useful language box.

Explain that modifiers such as quite or not very change (or modify) the next word in the sentence, e.g. I’m quite tired. My brother isn’t very tall.

Ask stronger students to translate the modifiers into their language.

Give weaker students bilingual dictionaries so that they can find out how the modifiers translate into their language before they look in the description for examples of such words.

Check answers.

Answers

He’s very intelligent, and quite funny, too!

My brother’s great, and he’s a very good friend.

Language note

Modifiers such as very are often stressed in a sentence, particularly when someone is surprised, excited or enthusiastic about what they are saying.


4 • Students work alone to complete the sentences.

Ask some students to report back on how their partner has completed his or her sentences.



Get Writing

PLAN

5 • Students should do their planning in class. The writing can either be done in class or at home.

Tell students they are going to write a description of their best friend.

Refer students back to the chart in Exercise 2 and then ask them to work alone to complete the chart with notes about their best friend.



WRITE

6. Refer students to the language in Exercise 6. Make sure that students know how to use it before you ask them to write their description.

Tell students to use Javier’s description of David as a model to follow. Encourage them to add extra information to their own descriptions, e.g. whether or not the person has brothers or sisters, that person’s interests, what that person usually does in his or her free time, etc.

Give students ten minutes to complete the writing task.

Monitor while students are writing. Help with grammar and vocabulary as necessary.

Encourage students to produce at least two drafts of their description. If students are doing this at home, ask them to write their descriptions on their computers rather than in their notebooks as it will allow them to change the text more easily.



7 • Tell students that it is very important that they check their writing in order to look for ways to improve its content, style and structure.

Give students a few minutes to look through their descriptions and check them against the points here.

Collect students’ descriptions and mark them.

Use students’ written work as a means of finding common errors. You can then use these as a basis for revision in the next lesson (but do not refer to who made the mistake). Also remember to share good sentences from students’ work with the rest of the class.


Homework


For homework, ask students to find an interesting description of a person. If you have a library in your school, students can borrow books (at the right level) from it. If not, ask them to find books in English in their local library. In the next lesson, students read out the description to a partner and then say why they like it, e.g. It’s very funny. You can also set Exercises 1–12 on pages 22 and 23 of the Workbook for homework.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 10


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: CLIL. Math. Fractions


Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.1.6.1- organize and present information clearly to others

5.4.2.1- understand with little support specific information and detail in short, simple texts on a limited range of general and curricular topics;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

learn about fractions.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Organize information logically. Express ideas clearly

  • Identify details in a text with little support

Value links

Lifelong learning

Cross curricular links

Maths

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?

Background

The word fraction comes from the Latin word frangere, which

means ‘to break’.

Warm up

Books closed. Write the following on the board: ½, ¾.

Ask: Do you know what these are? Elicit or introduce the word fractions.

Ask: What is a fraction? Elicit students’ ideas, but do not accept or reject them at this point.



Practice

1 • Ask students to open their books at page 36.

Read out the definition and then ask students to work in pairs to match the pictures with the fractions. Be aware that some students may not perceive the world mathematically and so may require additional support.

Write the answers (the fractions and the corresponding pictures) on the board. Students can copy this into their notebooks.

Do not go into the pronunciation of the words half, third or quarter at this point.

Answers

1 c 2 a 3 b


2 • Read out the example.

Put students into small groups to continue the matching exercise.

3. 1.28 Play the recording for students to check their answers and repeat the words.

Pay particular attention to the pronunciation of ‘th’ as it can be a difficult sound to master.

To help students, break words up into distinct sounds, e.g. ‘fif’ and ‘th’. Drill one sound, then the other. When students are confident with the sounds, put the two sounds together to make a complete word.

Point out the fact that ‘l’ in half is silent, which means that the word is pronounced /hɑːf/ rather than /hɑːlf/.

Answers

2 h a quarter 3 a a third 4 e a sixth 5 d a fifth

6 b a seventh 7 f an eighth

8 g three quarters

Language note

Fractions such 1⁄3 or 1⁄5 are read one third and one fifth. However, fractions such as 2⁄3 or 3⁄5 are read two thirds and

three fifths. Note that when the numerator is 2 or above, the denominator (the second number) needs to have a plural

ending. We say two sevenths, for example, not two seventh. American English uses fourths rather than quarters, which

means that ¾ would be read three fourths.

Optional activity


Ask students to draw circles, squares, triangles and rectangles in their notebooks.

Students divide the shapes up into sections – halves, quarters, thirds, fifths, sixths, sevenths, etc. (It will be easier for students to divide rectangles up into fifths, sixths and sevenths than circles, squares and triangles.)

Students colour some of the sections, but leave other sections blank.

Students show their shapes to their partner who says what fraction of the shape has been coloured in.


4 • Read out the information about the numerator (the number above the line in a fraction) and denominator (the number below the line in a fraction).

Read out the questions and elicit the answers from the class.

Answers

numerator – 1 denominator – 8


5 • Put students into small groups and ask them to do the quiz.

Tell students to use the images to help them decide the answers in each case.

Monitor while students do the quiz and help as necessary.

Read out the quiz questions (including the multiple-choice answers) and elicit answers.

Answers

1 a 2 b 3 a

Your turn


6 • If you have a small class, put students in pairs for this activity. If you have a large class, put them into groups.

Give students (in their pairs or groups) five minutes to write their own fractions quiz based on the examples in Exercise 5.

Monitor while students write their quiz questions and make sure that the questions are accurate.

Then ask one student from each pair (or one member of each group) to come to the front of the class and read out their quiz questions for the rest of the class to answer.


Homework


For homework, ask students to try the fractions activities here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/teachers/ks2_activities/maths/fractions.shtml


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?







Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 11


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: Do the quiz. Australia in fractions

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.2.8.1 - understand supported narratives, including some extended talk, on an increasing range of general and curricular topics

5.2.2.1 - understand an increasing range of unsupported basic questions which ask for personal information;

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:


Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Recognize basic personal questions without support

  • Recognize the meaning of a story and extended talk with some support

Value links


Cross curricular links


Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?


Warm up

Tell students that you are going to watch video about Australia.

Summary

With awe-inspiring landscapes and impressive cities, The Land Down

Under extends beyond its vast deserts to the ocean that surrounds it. Australia is home to many people of different languages. It also claims some unusual animals that only live here and nowhere else.

Background

People from all over the world live in Australia. There are large

Greek and Chinese communities in particular.

Practice

VIDEO

Before you watch

1 Answer the question.

Ask the class: What is a ‘nickname’? Write nickname on the board. Elicit or teach the meaning of the word.

Find out if anyone in the class has a nickname.

Suggested answer

A nickname is an informal alternative name for someone or something, e.g. New York City is also known as the Big Apple.


While you watch

2 Watch the video and answer the question.

Tell students they are going to watch a video in which they will learn some facts about a country known by the nickname The Land Down Under.

Ask students to watch the video to answer the following question: What is the real name of the country?

Play the video.

Check the answer.

Answer

Australia


3 Watch the video and write the fractions.

Write the following sentences on the board:

1 ______ of the population speak English.

2 ______ of the population are from other countries.

3 ______ live in cities.

4 ______ live near the ocean.

5 ______ work in mines.

6 ______ of the country is desert.

Play the video again for students to watch and note down the fractions and what those fractions refer to.

Students can compare answers in pairs before you check answers with the class.

Answers

1 4/5 2 ¼ 3 9/10 4 ¾ 5 1/10 6 1/3


After you watch

4 Write a description of Australia.

Put students into pairs and ask them to write a description of Australia using the information from the video and any other information they can find out, e.g. Australia has got a population of 22 million and 1/3 of the country is desert.

Collect, check and display students’ work.



For Extension Activity see page 143 in Teacher’s Book


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?

Long-term plan unit: 3 VALUES

School:

Lesson 12


Date:

Teacher’s name:

CLASS:

Number present:

absent:

Theme of the lesson: What we value

Learning objective (s) that this lesson is contributing to

5.4.1.1- understand the main points in a limited range of short simple texts on general and curricular topics;

5.4.2.1- understand with little support specific information and detail in short, simple texts on a limited range of general and curricular topics;

5.4.6.1- recognize the attitude or opinion of the writer in short texts on a limited range of general and curricular topics

Lesson objectives

All learners will be able to:

Most learners will be able to:

read an article about Batyrkhan Shukenov.

decide if information about the article is true or false.

talk about how to improve the lives of children around the world.

Some learners will be able to:

Success criteria

  • Read and identify the main idea in the text

  • Identify details in a text with little support

  • Identify the attitude and opinion of the author

Value links

Respect, openness

Cross curricular links

Kazakh, Russian

Plan

Stages of the lesson

Planned activities (replace the notes below with your planned activities)

Teacher’s notes

Greeting


Greet students; students respond to greeting and take their places.

Hello, boys and girls! How are you?

Preparation

Find out the names of some current UNICEF Goodwill Ambassadors that the students may know.

Find out about recent UNICEF projects in Kazakhstan.

Warm up

Books closed. Write Famous people from Kazakhstan on the

board. Ask students to name three famous Kazakhstanis, then

ask them why they are famous.

Ask students to share what else they know of the famous people whose names you elicited, focusing on whether these people have helped others.

Background

UNICEF /ˈjuːnɪˌsef/ is an agency of the United Nations. It was set up in 1946, and campaigns for children’s rights, helping governments to improve health and education for children, particularly in the world’s poorest countries. UNICEF stands for the United Nations Children’s Fund (it was known originally as the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund). A Goodwill Ambassador is someone who helps to promote a particular cause for one of the agencies of the United Nations. Celebrities are usually asked to perform the role, with well-known examples being the actress Angelina Jolie and ex-footballer David Beckham. The word good will is a noun which means a kind, friendly attitude (note that in the phrase Goodwill Ambassador the word goodwill functions as an adjective).

Practice

1 • Students open their books at page 37 and look at the photograph of Batyrkhan Shukenov. Ask students if they know who he was. Elicit any information about his career or his work for UNICEF.

If students are not familiar with Shukenov’s music, you could play the class one of his hit songs, such as Julia.

Check students’ understanding of the following key vocabulary from the article: band, bass guitarist, lead singer,

hit (n), popular, global organisation, help (n and v), war.

Ask students to read the text and then refer them to sentences 1–6, making sure students understand them.

Help weaker students by showing how the first item in the exercise is false. We know it is false because the first sentence in the article tells us that Shukenov 'was a famous musician from Kazakhstan'.

Ask students to work in pairs to do the task. Encourage them to read the text carefully to find the answers and remind them to correct the false sentences.

Answers

1 F (He was a famous Kazakhstani musician / musician from Kazakhstan.) 2 T 3 T 4 F (Their song Julia was popular in Kazakhstan and Russia.) 5 F (UNICEF Goodwill

Ambassadors help children.) 6 F (UNICEF is a global organisation / works with children in many countries.)


As a follow-up, give students the names of some current UNICEF Goodwill Ambassadors and ask students why they

are famous. You can also tell students about UNICEF's work

with children in Kazakhstan.


Optional activity


In small groups of three or four, students discuss how the lives of children in Kazakhstan and the world as a whole can be improved.

Monitor while students do this, helping with ideas and vocabulary as necessary, e.g. We can donate money to charities. We can ask governments to spend money on health and education programmes for the poorest children.

Ask groups to present their ideas to the class. You could then continue the discussion with the class as a whole.

Homework


For homework, ask students to research a local project or charity that helps children or young people. Students should name the project and describe briefly what it does. At the beginning of the next lesson, students can do a short presentation on the project they researched.


Additional Information

Differentiation - how do you plan to give more support? How do you plan to challenge the more able learners?

Assessment - how are you planning to check learners` learning?

Health and safety check ICT links

More support will be given to weaker learners by giving them a modified worksheets in some tasks with greater support

-through questioning and the redirecting of questioning in feedback activities

-through observation in group and end performance activities

-through formative task



-Health promoting techniques

-Breaks and physical activities used.

-Points from Safety rules used at this lesson.

REFLECTION


Answer the most relevant questions to reflect on your lesson.

Were the lesson objectives/learning objectives realistic?

What did the learners learn? What did/didn’t you like? What was difficult?





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Автор Ташубаева Гулия Тумарбековна
Дата добавления 06.01.2018
Раздел Другое
Подраздел Другое
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